Fragment of a water spout in the shape of a lion-head, from Corinth

Classification
Culture
Dimensions
height: 18.2 cm; width: 24.5 cm, depth: 21.2 cm
Date
second quarter of the 4th century B.C.
Iconography
Findspot
Inventory
4753
ID
Hyp-3958
References
Szilágyi, J. Gy., Antik Gyűjtemény, 57; Szilágyi, J. Gy., Ancient Art, 64

Rainwater drained off the roofs of buildings through figural waterspouts placed at regular intervals. These usually had the shape of a lion’s head, with water flowing from the animal’s mouth. Such “taps” were also placed on the public fountains that provided households with water. This piece was unearthed at one of Corinth’s central fountains, the Glauke Fountain.

Marble analyses conducted by Danielle Decrouez (Geneva, Museum of Natural History) and Karl Ramseyer (University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences) have shown that the water spout was made of Pentelic marble. Click here for the detailed results.