Fragment of a fountain statue: girl with water jar

Classification
Culture
Dimensions
height: 112 cm, width: 45 cm, depth: 52 cm
Date
100–140 AD
Iconography
Findspot
Inventory
4730
ID
Hyp-6880
References
Hekler 1929, 141, no. 133

This statue was modelled on Timotheos' statue, which represented Leda embracing the swan (ca. 375–360).
More than thirty copies of the statue are known from Hellenistic and Roman times (their date varies between the 2nd century BC and the 2nd century AD), most of which closely follow Timotheos’s model. The sculptor of the Budapest piece, however, chose a new path: although in many details he did imitate the statue of Leda, the swan was replaced with a large water jar (now lost). He connected his piece to a water pipe, turning the famous Greek work into a fountain statue. The Leda of Timotheos raised her right hand to cover the swan with her mantle. But the figure of the Budapest statue held the jar with both hands: the representation of myth thus became a genre scene befitting its function. The statue probably stood in a Roman garden.

Marble analyses conducted by Danielle Decrouez (Geneva, Museum of Natural History) and Karl Ramseyer (University of Bern, Institute of Geological Sciences) have shown that the statue was made of Pentelic marble. Click here for the detailed results.